Fights are Inevitable: How to Approach Them Wengie Style

Is it possible to actually argue better? While it seems fairly counterintuitive, Wengie put it into a perspective that is easier to understand and is advantageous in the long run. In her vlog discussing fighting in a relationship, the Australian beauty blogger used this video as an opportunity to disclose her personal experiences, use her culture as something that is fairly conflicting in relation to this topic, and to provide great advice to her followers.

Describing her Asian culture as something that is fairly full of bottling up emotions and avoiding arguments at all costs, mention was made to the fact that she is also Australian, and understands that occasional fighting is a sign of caring. Essentially, whether you are from an open culture or a non-confrontational one, it is important to speak your mind and to use the fight as an opportunity for improvement.

How to Argue Better and Survive Relationship Fighting

Set Ground Rules

Though it seems a tad awkward to sit down with your partner to prepare for a fight, it is important to guarantee that the fights do not escalate in the future. If you are a person that needs space after an argument, disclose that to your partner early on. If you prefer to talk things out, let that be known, too.

Establish a Compromise

If you and your partner are both stubborn, discussing what would be a fair compromise is important. Basically, state that you are both going to be wrong from time to time, but never let that be a means to gloat.

Do Not Insult nor Threaten Breakups

Insults and empty threats not only force a partner to continuously walk on egg shells for the rest of the relationship, but they defeat the purpose of the entire relationship. Wengie used not doing the dishes as her example, and said it is important to state your irritation for not doing the chore, but to refrain from calling your partner lazy.

Never Accuse and Never Say Always

Before accusing your partner, consider all possible circumstances that could have resulted in them doing what they did to make you angry. Accusations are often wrong and have no facts to support them, after all. Additionally, saying that your partner always forgets to do the dishes, for example, is unjust and, again, often not true. Remaining rational in an argument is the most beneficial thing to do, essentially.

 

Learn more about Wengie:

http://socialblade.com/youtube/user/wwwengie