The OSI Group and McDonalds Connection Could be a Catalyst for Healthy Foods

There debate against intensive animal farming and the downside health and environmental risks associated with livestock products got a boost in 2011, thanks to the research tabled by Stanford biochemistry professor, Patrick brown. His efforts culminated into the founding of Impossible Foods in 2011. Brown’s company specializes in the analysis of the molecular formation of animal products. The nutrients and proteins in the animal products are then highlighted and that very molecular formula replaced with similar plant-based proteins and nutrients to provide healthier alternatives to meat products.

The OSI Group is a meat processing firm with several hundred plants and operations in over 10 countries. Its major markets entail the extensive retail industry and the food services sector including other outlets in the US, China, parts of Asia and the majority of the franchise’s shops in Europe. This heavy command of the upstream meat supply chain could be directly affected, in a positive way, following the recent strategic alliance between the mega meat processor and Impossible Foods.

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Impossible Foods is well-known for its Impossible Burger and other plant-based meat substitutes. The innovation is major in the food industry and has been responsible for the significant surge in demand for Impossible Foods’ products, especially in North America.

The list of investors and strategic partners lining up to amplify Impossible Foods’ growth has increased drastically. The latest to join hands with the organic meat producers is the OSI Group McDonalds which aims to use its economies of scale in food production to accelerate capacity and production of the Impossible Burger at one of its facilities in Oakland, California.

How does this plan line up with McDonalds vision? Well, the changing customer preferences such as the growing interest in vegan diets and calls for food retailers to offer more healthy foods has forced the franchise to switch-up its menus.

Most of the franchise’s restaurants now serve salads, smoothies, fruits, and hopefully will include plant-based meat products such as the Impossible Burger and natural sausage products based on the new-found collaboration between McDonalds chief supplier and Impossible Foods. Several major retail food stations and brands have already started testing out Impossible Foods products and it would be advisable for McDonalds to jump on the trend.

Related: https://www.chicagobusiness.com/restaurants/mcdonalds-planning-meatless-burger